Chevrolet Camaro

Classified as both a “pony” car and a “muscle” car, the Chevy Camaro’s flexibility has been explored over six generations, despite a few gaps (most notably from 2002-2009) in the production.

Its entrance into the industry in the late 1960’s was shrouded in mystery, including a code name (“panther”), intriguing, enigmatic telegrams, and a press conference that connected fourteen cities in real time via telephone, a feat which had never been done before.

The Camaro’s origin stemmed from the French language, the word “camarade” turning into “camaro”, as the designers wanted something that would call to mind the image of a partnership between driver and vehicle, while still keeping their tie to Chevrolet’s vehicle line which always started with the letter “C” – such as the Corvair (the Camaro’s predecessor), the Chevelle, and the Corvette.

While the Chevy Camaro is primarily known as a “pony” or “muscle” car, this hasn’t prevented it from being a popular choice in the racing world, especially in drag racing and road racing. There’s even a specific Camaro Cup (since the mid 1970’s) in Sweden, and in the U.S., all the Chevrolet NASCAR teams on the Xfinity Series circuit use the Camaro. The Camaro as driven by Bob Jane placed first in both the 1971 and 1972 Australia Touring Car Championship, and was used as a pace car for NASCAR in Indianapolis, Daytona, Watkins Glen, Mosport (Canada), and the Charlotte Motor Speedway.

While the Camaro may not be as flashy or iconic as some other vehicles, it has been part of product placement deals on several media platforms, along with its two most famous appearances, as the car “Bumblebee” in the Transformers film franchise from Michael Bay (both as a 1970’s model and a fifth generation), and on the popular TV show Hawaii 5-0, which is provided with most of their vehicles by Chevrolet.