Kenworth T-660

Kenworth T-660

Did you know that the Kenworth T-660 design is based on the Kenworth W900? The main differences between them are frame and suspension as well as aerodynamic design (the Kenworth T-660 is incredibly aerodynamic, drastically reducing the amount of drag and conserving more fuel for longer trips).

Even though the T-660 has been retired since 2016 in favor of the Kenworth T-680, it’s still immensely popular, even when put up against other popular types of vehicles, such as the Peterbilt. They also manage to retain their value more than any other used truck, including Peterbilt models. Kenworth’s dedication to excellence and updating their vehicles has ensured that many, if not most, drivers are repeat customers.

They’ve also gone global, reaching around the globe to include factories and facilities in North America (Canada, the United States, and Mexico) and Australia. The Kenworth is quite recognizable on its own, but it’s also easily upgraded to include special features or chrome-covered parts, in case you want to make your own vehicle stand out just a little bit more.

Though purchasing a new Kenworth will set you back more than if you were to buy from a competitor, the longevity of a Kenworth is why many drivers choose it over and over again. With its aerodynamic shape, fuel efficiency, and performance, it has remained popular for good reason.

The GMC Cabover

Did you know that the first “cabover” in the United States was revealed in 1899? While they were not quite what we think of when COEs are mentioned today, their introduction brought a slew of new designs and practical applications for trucks that were used for a variety of urban and rural jobs in the early 1900’s. COEs like the GMC are popular still, over a century later, though of course rules and regulations have come into play and were instrumental in varying designs, since there are limits to how long and wide the truck and trailer can be.

Over the years, COEs have enjoyed popularity in a wide portion of the globe, most notably North America, Australia, and Asia. While the GMC COEs are no longer being produced under the GMC label (most production ended sometime prior to 1990), older models are still on the road today, as garbage trucks, dump trucks, and haulers.

Other GMCs, like the one below, have been rebirthed as unique vehicles tailored to their owners’ needs. They’re rare, but worth hunting down if you’re into collecting photos of antique or re-purposed vehicles. This one boasts a fifth wheel, low mileage (it was mostly stationary prior to the new owner’s purchase), and a gas ration card from World War II. You can visit the Old Chevy Trucks website to learn more about this particular model as well as other projects.

You can see our gallery for this one below. All the images on our website expand when you click them, so you can get a better look.

For more from Old Chevy Trucks, find them indexed in our vehicles, trucking and RVing directory. You can search for the company’s name and look for suppliers and dealers in an area near you by¬†looking at our regional headers. And to see more Trucks, click here.

Chevrolet El Camino

Did you know that the reason the El Camino truck even exists is because of the wife of an Australian farmer? In the early 1930’s, Chevrolet received a letter from a farmer’s wife who wished for a car that she would feel comfortable driving into town, but that could also be used for farm chores. The truck was the first of Chevrolet’s utility coupes, an alteration of a station wagon, utilizing the design in order to incorporate the truck bed. Though it premiered in Australia, the truck eventually made its way to America, debuting in the late 1950’s and sticking around until the late 1980’s. Styled as a coupe utility pickup muscle car, the El Camino truck may not be spending as much time on the farm as previously expected, since it does well with the muscle car crowd and can be seen cruising downtown streets at any time of day or night.

During its run, the El Camino went through five generations, and by the end of the late 80’s, it was available with a variety of trims, engine choices, and various conversion packages. Later models were trimmer than the first few generations, and the last vehicles had V6 engines instead of the V8 it had been offered with in the 1960’s and 1970’s.

After its entrance into the market, the El Camino truck received some competition from Ford, with its own version, The Ranchero. Initially, the El Camino was more popular, since the conservatively designed Ranchero wasn’t as snazzy as the newer truck, but in a few years, the tides turned, and the El Camino was discontinued due to plummeting sales after a re-vamp. There have been various prototypes that used the El Camino as inspiration, but so far, there hasn’t been a resurfacing of the truck. Here’s hoping this guy revs back up sometime in the near future.

You can see our gallery for this one below. All the images on our website expand when you click them, so you can get a better look.

For more from Hemmings, find them indexed in our vehicles, trucking and RVing directory. You can search for the company’s name and look for suppliers and dealers in an area near you by looking at our regional headers. And to see more Trucks, click here.