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Ram Pickup, Not a Dodge, But Does It Matter?

Trucks August 26, 2017

While most of us grew up calling this vehicle the “Dodge Ram”, the truck hasn’t been associated with Dodge since 2011, when Ram left the Dodge line of light trucks. Despite the name change, it remains one of the best trucks on the market, as evidenced by its five-time win as “Truck of the Year” (1994, 2003, 2010, 2013, 2014).

The front-engine, rear-wheel/four-wheel drive full-size pickup truck went into its fourth generation in 2009, with a new design by Ryan Nagode and Scott Krugger that was showcased in the 2008 North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Michigan. Updates included a new suspension system, a hemi-engine option, a new storage system, and a four-door cab style option. It is also marketed with a “class-exclusive” manual transmission. It has a 6.7 L Cummins Turbo Diesel l6 engine, measures between 234.1 inches and 287 inches depending on the cab options.

The Ram Pickup is assembled in both the U.S. and Mexico with plants in Michigan (the Warren Truck Assembly) and Saltillo (the Saltillo Truck Assembly), and is available as a two-door regular cab, a 4-door quad, crew, or mega cab, or a Dually. The Gross Combined Weight Rating says it is capable of hauling between 11,000 – 15,500 pounds (The Ram 1500 and the 2WD Ram 1500 long bed with Hemi engine are specified).

In spite of its more blue collar background, the Ram Pickup is not just a heavy lifter. It’s also involved in the world of motorsports, and has won two championships (the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series Manufacturers’ Championship in 2003 and 2004 and the San Felipe 250 in 2008 and 2009).

The Ram also comes in many different forms, with several special editions over the years, including the Power Wagon (the off-road version), the Rumble Bee (a limited sport-truck version), the Spirit of ’76 (celebrating America’s Bicentennial), and the Nightrunner (2000 were made in 2006 and were painted in Brilliant Black, had chrome rims and grill, a 5.7 L Hemi engine, dark shaded headlamps, and Nightrunner trim, logos, and embroidery).

The truck does well domestically and abroad, selling in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico as well as in Latin America (Brazil, Colombia, Argentia, Chile, Paraguay), Europe, and the Middle East.

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